Wellcome Image Awards 2017

Credit: Spooky Pooka

A digital illustration portraying a personal experience of Crohn’s disease is the overall winner of the Wellcome Image Awards 2017.

‘Stickman – The Vicissitudes of Crohn’s (Resolution)’ is a striking computer-generated image which conveys the physical and emotional experience of Crohn’s disease, a chronic condition caused by inflammation of the digestive system.

It is part of a series incorporating Stickman, the alter ego of illustrator Spooky Pooka (Oliver), who has the disease.

‘Stickman’ is one of 22 winning images that showcase the best in science image making.

Fergus Walsh, BBC Medical Correspondent and a member of the judging panel, said: “This image is a stunning representation of what it must be like to have Crohn’s disease. It’s like nothing I’ve seen before in terms of the portrayal of someone’s condition: it conveys the pain and torment the sufferer must go through. The image really resonates and is beautifully composed: it’s a haunting piece.

The awards have been held annually since 1997 to reward contributors to the Wellcome Images collection for their outstanding work.

To find out more and to see all the winning images, follow this link to the Wellcome Image Awards 2017

Image of the Week: An Unconscious Naked Man

I like this strange painting depicting the effects of chloroform

Wellcome Trust Blog

V0017053 An unconscious naked man An unconscious naked man, symbolising the effects of chloroform on the human body, R. Cooper.

A new exhibition opened at Wellcome Collection this week. ‘States of Mind: Tracing the Edges of Consciousness’ explores our understanding of the conscious experience from different perspectives. Calum Wiggins, a graduate trainee at the Wellcome Trust, has picked out a painting from the exhibition as our Image of the Week.

Henry Wellcome was an avid collector. Not content with gathering objects already in existence, he would also commission artworks to fill gaps in his collection. Wellcome wanted to have a representation of each of the important moments in this history of medicine and this watercolour was one of many painted by Richard Tennant Cooper at his request.

The disconcerting scene is the artist’s interpretation of the effects of chloroform on the human body. Demons armed with both surgical and musical instruments surround the man…

View original post 270 more words

Image of the Week: Lung Cancer Cells

Wellcome Trust Blog

B0006883 Lung cancer cells

This Image of the Week was written by Alice Sheehan.

This month is lung cancer awareness month, which aims to raise the profile of one of the world’s biggest cancer killers.

Cancer is a condition where cells in a part of the body grow and reproduce uncontrollably. Cancer cells invade healthy tissue disrupting their functions or killing them and can for example limit an organs blood supply. Cancer can occur due to a combination of different factors; however some types which have been linked to lifestyle, such as kidney and liver cancers, are becoming more common in some populations.

Our image of the week is of a lung cancer cell in the latter stages of cell division. During cell division a single cell duplicates its genetic information and then splits to form two separate cells. In the image, the two ‘daughter cells’ have nearly separated completely from each other, with only…

View original post 173 more words

Image of the week: ‘ferning’ saliva

Wellcome Trust Blog

B0008610 Human saliva displaying ferning

The beautiful branching structure of these crystal formations may remind you of minature ferns. If so, you aren’t alone – our image this week depicts of a phenomenon known as “ferning”!  What you are looking at here is a microscope image of human saliva.

The ferning pattern of crystallization is used to identify when a woman is at their most fertile period in the menstrual cycle. The oestrogen spike during a woman’s most fertile period causes salt crystals to form in her saliva, creating this pattern when magnified.

Although studies suggest that the reliability of this as a measure of ovulation is relatively weak, research  has begun to investigate specific substances found in saliva during ovulation, creating potential for a non-invasive diagnostic marker for ovulation. Knowing when ovulation occurs is important in IVF and other fertility treatments, but the best methods currently involve taking blood or ultrasounds.

Saliva ferning has also been investigated as…

View original post 99 more words

Image of the Week: Dissection

Wellcome Trust Blog

L0057749 Part of a human stomach dissected by Edward Jenner, England,

This week’s image of the week is interesting for a number of reasons. At first glance, it looks like a delicate antique fan that might keep you cool in the heat of summer, but in reality it is something entirely different.

What you’re actually seeing here is a thin section of a human stomach, which has been flattened and injected with wax. This technique was used to show the veins, arteries and delicate membrane of the stomach wall, which wouldn’t be so easily identifiable without wax.

This specimen dates back to between 1790 and 1823, and the other interesting fact is that it was prepared by Edward Jenner, more commonly known for his pioneering work on vaccination.

Thought of by many as ‘the father of immunology’, Jenner’s work helped lead to the eradication of smallpox. He was also known for his delicate dissections, which were an important part of medical education…

View original post 92 more words

Image of the week: Ebola

Wellcome Trust Blog

L0076142 Ebola. Sculpture by Luke Jerram, c. 2004

This week’s image is of a sculpture of the Ebola virus, created by artist Luke Jerram.

It is an unusual, and artistic, take on Ebola. With the virus continuing to spread in West Africa and the responses from the global health community regularly in the news, we’ve found that journalists and health writers have been requesting images of the virus, but they are not easy to come by.

Made entirely of glass, Luke’s sculpture is approximately one million times larger than the virus itself, and is part of a series of similar glass-works called Glass Microbiology.

All the pieces in this series are transparent and colourless, in deliberate contrast to artificially coloured scientific images. Being smaller than the wavelength of light, viruses in fact have no colour. To create the series, Luke worked in consultation with virologists from the University of Bristol, and photographs of his work have…

View original post 100 more words

Image of the Week: Wiring of the human brain

Wellcome Trust Blog

Wiring of the human brain

Spark the imagination… submit your images for the 2015 Wellcome Image Awards now! If you are a research scientist, photographer or illustrator, your images could reach a global audience. The winning images will go on display at science centres and public galleries across the UK. We are looking for high quality imagery that relates to biomedical science and contemporary healthcare, and are interested in all artistic media and imaging techniques, from hand-drawn illustrations to super-resolution microscopy and functional MRI scans. Any images we receive before 30 September 2014 will be considered for the Wellcome Image Awards 2015. Email Sabrina Taner for more information about this.

To inspire you, this week’s image focuses on one of the 2014 Award winners, a bird’s-eye view of nerve fibres in a normal, healthy adult human brain. The back of the brain is on the left of the image and the left side of…

View original post 384 more words